Workshop

Workshop: Computational Linguistics for Libraries, Archives and Museums at CODE4LIB

  • Posted on: 12 March 2014
  • By: warren
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CLLAM Workshop (Computational Linguistics for Libraries, Archives and Museums)
Code4Lib Conference 2014, Raleigh, NC, USA
Monday, March 24
Joint presentations with Corey Harper, Amalia Levi, Douglas W. Oard and Robert Warren.
 
We will hack at the intersection of diverse content from Libraries, Archives and Museums and bleeding edge tools from computational linguistics for slicing and dicing that content. Did you just acquire the email archives of a start-up company? Maybe you can automatically build an org chart. Have you got metadata in a slew of languages? Perhaps you can search it all using one query. Is name authority control for e-resources getting too costly? Let's see if entity linking techniques can help. These are just a few teasers.
 

There will be plenty of content and tools supplied, but please bring your own [data] too -- you'll hack with it in new ways throughout the day. We'll get started with some lightning talks on what we've brought, then we'll break up into groups to experiment and work on the ideas that appeal. Three guaranteed outcomes: you'll walk away with new ideas, new tools, and new people you'll have met.

Attending the Bridging Communities of Practice: Emerging Technologies for Content-Centered Linking Workshop

  • Posted on: 10 September 2013
  • By: warren
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Attending the Bridging Communities of Practice: Emerging Technologies for Content-Centered Linking Workshop
College of Information Studies University of Maryland, College Park
Hornbake Library, South Wing, Room 2119
September 27-28, 2013
 
Over the course of two workshops, we seek to bring together humanities scholars, information professionals and computer scientists to enhance the transformational potential of linked open data in libraries, archives, museums and other settings by leveraging a broad range of emerging content representation and linking technologies. We believe that accelerating the process of bringing these computational innovations across the "gulf of execution" from laboratory to practice can create important new opportunities for humanities scholarship